New NFL Touchback Rules Could Lead To Brad Daluiso-esque Proportions

Discussion in 'NFL General Discussion' started by BigBlueBruiser, May 30, 2011.

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    The NFL moved the kickoff line from the 35 to the 30 back in 1994 because it was unhappy with the number of kickoffs that were turning into touchbacks. The move worked, as the percentage of touchbacks went from 27 percent to 7 percent, but since then, it has moved back up to 16 percent. There are a lot more big legs in the league now than there were 18 years ago. Back when the NFL made the move to the 30, Giants kickoff specialist Brad Daluiso was in a class by himself. His 66.7 yard per kick average and his 60.9 percent touchback percentage was good enough to allow him to make a living without the accuracy to be a regular field goal kicker.

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  2. Daluiso holds the all-time touchback record (30-35 yards) with 52 back in 1992. Only 13 of his 65 kickoffs that season weren't touchbacks.

    When he joined the Giants in 1993.....39 of his 64 kickoffs went for touchbacks. Still very impressive considering the swirling winds at Giants Stadium.....which was one of if not the toughest places to kick in the NFL.

    With the legs of the kickers in the NFL today.....the chances of them approaching Daluiso's mark now that kickoffs are back to the 35 are now greater.

    Daluiso never made a Pro Bowl and was erratic at times.....finishing with a career FG percentage of 76.2 percent. But if the Pro Bowl ever created a spot for kickoff specialists.....Brad would be a perennial at the position.

    The new rules would allow kickers like Cowboys kicker David Buehler....who seems like a modern day Daluiso....to have a new lease on life as a kickoff specialist.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 30, 2011
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  4. Inclulbus

    Inclulbus WE ARE! .. Marshall! GIF OG

    The game is going to be missing a big part of itself without kickoffs.. there has been one in this entire cowboys vs broncos game so far.
     

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